Designing for an accessible city

Leer Madrid

Leer Madrid

Designing for an accessible city
client
Ayuntamiento de Madrid
location
Madrid, Spain
size
604 km²

Madrid’s rich cultural and architectural heritage make it a popular tourist destination. But Madrid has a wayfinding problem: research revealed that 32% of visitors and even 23% of residents had been lost in the previous week. This illegibility is discouraging exploration of the city, with people preferring not to stray from the familiar.

The Leer Madrid initiative aims to increase legibility throughout the city, delivering information in an accessible way to all users no matter their background, age, ethnicity or ability. A prototype on-street sign system installed in Vallecas is just the first step in delivering the Wayfinding Master Plan.

13%

of Madrid’s residents are non-nationals

76%

of Madrid’s residents whose primary language is not Spanish

24%

of the population will be over 65 years of age in 2030

9 million

number of tourists in 2016

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

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Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

Prototyping in Sierra de Guadalupe, Vallecas
Initial prototypes achieved three practical objectives: to improve mobility for pedestrians and cyclists, to make the connection between transport modes seamless, and to enhance the visibility of the area’s main destinations.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

Prototyping in Sierra de Guadalupe, Vallecas
Initial prototypes achieved three practical objectives: to improve mobility for pedestrians and cyclists, to make the connection between transport modes seamless, and to enhance the visibility of the area’s main destinations.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

Prototyping in Sierra de Guadalupe, Vallecas
Initial prototypes achieved three practical objectives: to improve mobility for pedestrians and cyclists, to make the connection between transport modes seamless, and to enhance the visibility of the area’s main destinations.

System vision
The system is designed to connect the city and its transport modes, to provide the key for navigation and exploration, and to be usable by everybody, no matter their ability.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

Prototyping in Sierra de Guadalupe, Vallecas
Initial prototypes achieved three practical objectives: to improve mobility for pedestrians and cyclists, to make the connection between transport modes seamless, and to enhance the visibility of the area’s main destinations.

System vision
The system is designed to connect the city and its transport modes, to provide the key for navigation and exploration, and to be usable by everybody, no matter their ability.

A city of contrasts
A major European business and visitor destination, Madrid is a city of wide impressive boulevards. Their size and strength often obscure a maze of side streets that harbour unique interesting communities and destinations.

Mental mapping
Surveys revealed almost half of the respondents unfamiliar with the city relied on third party mobile tools to support their journeys, tended to stay at the city centre instead of exploring sites in the periphery, and none used existing signage in the city.

Principles and vision
The Wayfinding Master Plan provides the tools needed to take the project forward with principles and vision, flow benefits and information requirements. An implementation plan details the next steps for delivering a complete integrated system.

Diversity and accessibility
User research also uncovered an ageing population with less mobility and a great need to provide accessible information to users with disabilities. Providing accessible information for everybody is a primary goal.

Engaging communities
Every city has a wide range of organisations, groups and communities that benefit from a comprehensive system. A central principle is to create a system that unites these groups, so engaging from the very beginning is paramount.

Naming consultation
Rationalising and organising nomenclature is crucial to creating a joined-up system. Then residents and visitors will find place names easy to remember, use in conversation and rely on.

Prototyping in Sierra de Guadalupe, Vallecas
Initial prototypes achieved three practical objectives: to improve mobility for pedestrians and cyclists, to make the connection between transport modes seamless, and to enhance the visibility of the area’s main destinations.

System vision
The system is designed to connect the city and its transport modes, to provide the key for navigation and exploration, and to be usable by everybody, no matter their ability.